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This Sunday’s Readings

This weeks readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which uses the New American Bible.

Click here for THIS SUNDAY’s  readings

NEW! Click to Listen to THIS SUNDAY’s readings

 

The Word on Fire

The Word On Fire – Fr. Robert Barron’s internet site offers many interesting insights into all things Catholic. Fr. Barron has a full library of homilies that he has prepared and we will be featuring a link here to his 15 minute reflections on this week’s readings.

This Sunday: Religion serves a unitive purpose. In uniting the person to God, religion unites people together. However, many religious people forget religion’s purpose. They like to puff up their egos, reveling in their ability to live according to the Law. Seeing themselves as better than the rest, they forget that grace only comes to those who realize they are sinners. The tax collector, realizing he is a sinful man, does not focus on himself, but focuses his gaze and hunger on God – the source of salvation. Justification comes to those who do likewise. .…”

Click here to listen to Fr. Barron’s Homily for This Sunday

Fr. Greg Friedman

Sunday Soundbites is a weekly, 90-second radio homily based on the Sunday readings, written and read by Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. Sunday Soundbites is also heard on Catholic radio stations around the country.

This Sunday: Today’s Gospel continues a series of Gospel reflections on prayer. Prayers of petition are usually the easiest to pray. My Franciscan community spends an extended time before we begin our evening meal together, and we pray out loud for a variety of intentions—our families, friends, our inner-city neighbors, the wider world around us. Sometimes the same intentions come week after week. We try to be patient in waiting for God to answer those prayers... .

Click here to listen to This Sunday’s Soundbite.

 

The ChurchYear.Net site is a resource that provides short and highly readable information on the Church Liturgical Year.

Ordinary Time is the liturgical period outside of the other liturgical seasons, and runs 33 or 34 weeks. In Latin, Ordinary Time is called Tempus Per Annum (“time throughout the year”). The season falls between Christmas and Lent, and between Easter and Advent, exclusive

Click here to read more about Ordinary Time

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