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This Sunday’s Readings

This weeks readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which uses the New American Bible.

Click here for THIS SUNDAY’S  readings

 

 

The Word on Fire

The Word On Fire – Fr. Robert Barron’s internet site offers many interesting insights into all things Catholic. Fr. Barron has a full library of homilies that he has prepared and we will be featuring a link here to his 15 minute reflections on this week’s readings.

This Sunday: Our readings for this weekend are completely counter-cultural and counter-intuitive. We put a huge premium on freedom and self-determination in regard to choosing our careers. But this is not the Biblical perspective. Elisha accepts the mantle of prophecy, simply because God commands him, and he leaves everything behind. Jesus tells a man to follow him, even if that means not attending his own father’s funeral. In the determination of the meaning of your life, what, or better who, finally matters?. .…”

Click here to listen to Fr. Barron’s Homily for This Sunday

Fr. Greg Friedman

Sunday Soundbites is a weekly, 90-second radio homily based on the Sunday readings, written and read by Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. Sunday Soundbites is also heard on Catholic radio stations around the country.

This Sunday: In the late nineteenth century, Franciscan Friars from my home province in Cincinnati, Ohio, went to minister among the Navajo people in the territories of Arizona and New Mexico. The friars reached the Southwest by train, but their travels around the mission field were by horse, wagon or on foot. Their adventures on the road in that frontier territory were often quite hazardous. A sudden storm could wash out desert roads. And there were other dangers: One old photo shows a friar in his habit, and seated nearby is a cowboy with a vicious-looking six-shooter.

Click here to listen to This Sunday’s Soundbite.

 

The ChurchYear.Net site is a resource that provides short and highly readable information on the Church Liturgical Year.

Ordinary Time is the liturgical period outside of the other liturgical seasons, and runs 33 or 34 weeks. In Latin, Ordinary Time is called Tempus Per Annum (“time throughout the year”). The season falls between Christmas and Lent, and between Easter and Advent, exclusive

Click here to read more about Ordinary Time

 


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