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If you dropped by yesterday you would have noticed the “This Sunday” post. I try my best to have this up every Tuesday, and it provides folks with links that will help you prepare for the upcoming Sunday’s liturgy of the word.

This week I encourage you, if you have not already done so, to listen to Fr. Robert Barron’s homily. Fr. Barron, as he often does, spends most of his reflection examining the link between the old testament reading about the anointing of David as King of Israel and Jesus. It is worth your time.

What I have been thinking about is the title of “Christ the King” and what would Jesus think of this designation?

It is not a title Jesus seemed to argue for that much. In fact when Pilate asks Jesus, “Are you the king of the Jews?”  Jesus said to him in reply, “You say so.”

Jesus does want us all to know that he is the Son of God/Man and that he is the Good Shepard.

Clearly Jesus is a King but not like any king of this world. What kind of a mortal king would welcome a convicted criminal into his “Kingdom” as one of his final acts on earth!

Here is a quick except from an article on Wikipedia called “Names and titles of Jesus in the New Testament”:

King of the Jews

The title of “King of the Jews” is used to refer to Jesus in two recorded episodes during his life. It is first used by the Magi, who ask of King Herod “Where is the one who has been born king of the Jews? We saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him”.The teachers of the law answer that he will be found in Bethlehem, according to the prophesy of Micah.

It is again used in Jesus’ trial. In all of the gospels, Pilate is recorded as asking Jesus “Are you king of the Jews?”, to which Jesus replies “You have said so”.This may imply that the Sanhedrin told Pilate that Jesus had claimed this title, see also Sanhedrin Trial of Jesus. Pilate then orders the written charge on the sign on Jesus’ cross to read “Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews”.John reports that the sign was written in Aramaic, Latin and Greek. In Latin this can be translated as “Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum”. The abbreviation INRI is therefore used to represent this in many depictions of Jesus’ crucifixion.

Other titles for Jesus in the New Testament

  • Prophet
  • Lord
  • Son of Man
  • Son of God
  • King of the Jews
  • Lamb of God
  • Christ, the new Adam
  • Rabboni/Rabbi
  • Apostle
  • Paraclete
  • Mediator
  • High Priest
  • Logos
  • Immanuel
  • Head of the Church

One Response to ““This is the King of the Jews.””

  1. […] The title Christ the King is an interesting one. When I was researching the many different designations we give to Jesus- The Word/ Teacher/ Son of Man/ Son of God- the one Jesus seems to distance himself from is the title of king. Our Lord seemed to be more interested in being seen as a lowly Sheppard than as royalty. […]