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Tag Archive 'Prodigal Son'

Here is a song called Prodigal by Casting Crowns. As we wrap up our weekend reflections on the many stories contained in the Parable of the “Lost Sons” take a moment with these lyrics and the picture. (The lyrics are below the video. Sorry about the Google Ads- Simply click the X and they should […]

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We are called to be as compassionate as God is compassionate. We are called to follow Jesus’ example as a son – “the younger son without being rebellious” and “the elder son without being resentful.” We are also called to grow into spiritual fatherhood – this means both father and mother, masculine and feminine. All […]

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Nouwen says the painting just as easily could have been called “The Welcome by the Compassionate Father.” In the painting, the father’s hands are the true central point. The light and the eyes of others focus on those hands. The left hand is masculine while the right hand is more feminine. So the character “is […]

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The elder son usually gets little attention in discussions of this Bible story. Yet, Nouwen explains how both Rembrandt and Henri himself had part of the dark, resentful side of the “elder son” in them. Henri admits he understands the envy that the elder son feels toward his younger brother. The elder son lived an […]

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Henri writes about the most famous person in the story: the younger son, the prodigal son. He says Rembrandt at a young age “had all the characteristics of the prodigal son: brash, self confident, spendthrift, sensual, and very arrogant”. The artist earned a lot, spent a lot, and lost a lot. The painting is about […]

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The book, “Return of the Prodigal Son”,  is  based on Nouwen’s reflections on a Rembrandt painting called Prodigal Son, which hangs in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Prologue and Introduction tell of Henri’s encounter with the painting itself in 1986 and his move to the L’Arche Daybreak community in the town of Richmond […]

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Some of my friends at St. Patrick’s may have noticed that I was scheduled to preach this weekend. As they (whoever they are) like to say nothing makes God smile more than people making plans. It turns out that this weekend is ShareLife Sunday, the annual appeal for folks to give to various Catholic Charities. […]

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We are called to be as compassionate as God is compassionate. We are called to follow Jesus’ example as a son – “the younger son without being rebellious” and “the elder son without being resentful.” We are also called to grow into spiritual fatherhood – this means both father and mother, masculine and feminine. All […]

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Last night at our St. Patrick’s Friends of Dismas meeting we examined the Elder Son as seen by Henri Nouwen in his book The Return of the Prodigal Son. Nouwen opens up the parable using the famous  painting of   THE RETURN OF THE PRODIGAL SON By Rembrandt. At the end of our evening we […]

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Last Monday the St. Patrick’s Friends of Dismas group kicked off a study of the best selling book by Henri Nouwen, The Return of the Prodigal Son- A Story of Homecoming. The theme of the first evening was- Encounter the Painting. The painting in question is Rembrandt’s famous portrayal of the parable which was one […]

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This year at our Friends of Dismas monthly  meetings at St. Patrick’s in Markham, we will be using Henri Nouwen’s best selling book- The Return of the Prodigal Son. In this story Nouwen uses Rembrandt’s painting of the parable as a way to examine our own journey from brokenness to understanding that we too are […]

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Nouwen says the painting just as easily could have been called “The Welcome by the Compassionate Father.” In the painting, the father’s hands are the true central point. The light and the eyes of others focus on those hands. The left hand is masculine while the right hand is more feminine. So the character “is […]

Read Full Post »

The elder son usually gets little attention in discussions of this Bible story. Yet, Nouwen explains how both Rembrandt and Henri himself had part of the dark, resentful side of the “elder son” in them. Henri admits he understands the envy that the elder son feels toward his younger brother. The elder son lived an […]

Read Full Post »

Henri writes about the most famous person in the story: the younger son, the prodigal son. He says Rembrandt at a young age “had all the characteristics of the prodigal son: brash, self confident, spendthrift, sensual, and very arrogant”. The artist earned a lot, spent a lot, and lost a lot. The painting is about […]

Read Full Post »

This is Henri Nouwen’s own personal favorite book, based on Nouwen’s reflections on a Rembrandt painting called Prodigal Son, which hangs in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Prologue and Introduction tell of Henri’s encounter with the painting itself in 1986 and his move to the L’Arche Daybreak community in the town of Richmond […]

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