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Tale of Two Popes

This Sunday’s Readings

This weeks readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which uses the New American Bible.

Click here for THIS SUNDAY’s  readings

Click Here to Listen to THIS SUNDAY’s readings

 

The Word on Fire

The Word On Fire – Fr. Robert Barron’s internet site offers many interesting insights into all things Catholic. Fr. Barron has a full library of homilies that he has prepared and we will be featuring a link here to his 15 minute reflections on this week’s readings.

This Sunday: “God sows his Word into each of our hearts liberally. He does not solely give his grace to those he knows will bear fruit. He sows the Word in everyone, but it doesn’t flourish for each person due to circumstances (secularism, anxiety, the allurement of the world), but strive to counter that by letting the Word open you to the implications of his Lordship. God is always giving himself to you, listen and act. ”

Click here to listen to Fr. Barron’s Homily for This Sunday

Fr. Greg Friedman

Sunday Soundbites is a weekly, 90-second radio homily based on the Sunday readings, written and read by Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. Sunday Soundbites is also heard on Catholic radio stations around the country.

This Sunday:For many years, I’ve worked at a parish that draws its members in part from a rural, farming area. Folks who work on a farm usually attend our earliest Sunday Mass. They’re a fascinating congregation to work with. I’m only guessing, but I wonder if their openness to the word of God has anything to do with their connection to the earth? The cycle of growing, the passage of seasons, the risks of planting crops—all these activities teach a lot about life.

Click here to listen to This Sunday’s Soundbite.

The ChurchYear.Net site is a resource that provides short and highly readable information on the Church Liturgical Year.

Ordinary Time is the liturgical period outside of the other liturgical seasons, and runs 33 or 34 weeks. In Latin, Ordinary Time is called Tempus Per Annum (“time throughout the year”). The season falls between Christmas and Lent, and between Easter and Advent, exclusive.

Click here to read more about Ordinary Time

Elderly PriestA group of business professionals was gathered for their monthly luncheon. As was their custom once each year, they invited their pastors to join them. After the meal they had scheduled a famous actor to provide some entertainment as people were enjoying coffee and dessert. The actor stood before them dramatically reciting lines from famous plays and poetry. At one point he invited requests from those in attendance. One elderly priest rose and spoke. “Would you recite for us Psalm 23? The actor, a bit surprised by the unusual request, finally agreed. “Father,” he said,”I’ll agree to your request under one condition. After I recite the psalm, I’d be honored if you would then recite it too.” Reluctantly, the elderly priest agreed.

So the actor presented a stunningly beautiful recitation of Psalm 23, to which people responded with enthusiastic applause. Then he turned to the priest and said, “Okay, Father, your turn.” So the priest rather hesitantly stood and began reciting the famous psalm. “The Lord is my shepherd. There is nothing I shall want.”

When he finished, there was no applause, just hushed silence. The people, so moved by his simple recitation, were sitting with tears running down their faces. After a few moments the actor rose and spoke. “Ladies and gentlemen, I spoke to your ears. But this man has spoken to your hearts. And here’s the difference. I know Psalm 23. But this man knows the Shepherd.”

Source | Dan ShutteWalking the Sacred Path: Spiritual Exercises for Today
(Twenty-Third Publications, 2009)

Please take a moment to visit Fr. Philip WordPress site called Wisdom Stories to Live By at: http://philipchircop.wordpress.com/ where I found this ‘wisdom’ tale.

Fr. Philip also has a Tumblr site at: www.philipchircop.com/ where you can view his many bits of wisdom from the road.

Psalm 23

JailIt is said that no one truly knows a nation until one has been inside its jails. A nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones –Nelson Mandela (in Guiding Rage into Power)

Click here for original post on Bronnie Ware’s Book: Top Regrets of the Dying

Click here: Printer Friendly copy of speech to Brebeuf Graduates June 2014

Brebeuf CrestHere is a the text of a speech I recently gave at my Alma mater Brebeuf College School on June 27,2014.

It was quite an honour to return after 41 years to speak to the current day graduates of the school that had such a big impact on my life.

I guess much has changed in 41 years. For one we did not take any ‘slefies’ and the graduating class of 250 was a bit larger than the 40 or so that accepted diplomas in 1973.

One thing that has not changed- The Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey Leauge have still not won the Stanley Cup. At least that tradition is sacred.
I decided to talk about death. I realize that is a strange topic for a graduation speaker but it turns out dying has many useful lessons for the still young and seemingly invincible.

I would like to take just a few moments to share with you the very first time I ever wore my Brebeuf blazer in public. I am not sure if any of you remember this moment but for me; it is etched into my brain.

One of the reasons for this is the fact that the blazer itself just looked bad. My Mom always used to tell me that you could tell a bunch of men had been involved in picking out a uniform that consisted of a brown blazer with grey wool pants.

It was the summer of 1968, and we had made the requisite trip to the one store in Toronto that sold all the uniforms for Catholic Schools. I got measured, and the blazer was ordered about one size too big, so I could grow into it.

August rolled around, and my parents decided we would take a weekend trip to a hotel out by the airport for a little holiday. The hotel had a pool, and the owner was a client of my Dad’s which meant we got the rooms for free.

We were only there a short time when we got a call from my grandmother who was staying at our house looking after our dog. She was not feeling well so we had to cut our weekend short and get home as soon as we could.

I remember the paramedics (they weren’t called that back in 68) arrived and carried her out on a stretcher. My parents assured me and my two younger brothers that she was alright, and that she just needed some rest.

That night a phone call came into the house, and my Dad took it. I could tell right away something was wrong. He went into his bedroom where my Mom was resting and a few seconds later a loud scream came forth as my Mom learned that her mother had died.

I was 14, and this was the first time I had experienced a death of someone in our family. In 1963, both Pope John XXIII and US President Kennedy had died, and it was like a member of the family had passed away, but it was nothing like what was happening now.

A few days later we rushed down to this store where the brown blazers come from and picked up mine as I needed it to wear to my grandmother’s funeral. Not only that, I was selected to be one of the pallbearers along with another cousin.

Death may be a strange thing to talk about at a graduation. Most of these talks are about how you are the future and how your life is front of you.

This of course is true but there is much to learn about life by thinking about death.

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Perfect Marriage

FORE-GIVE<br /><br />
Yesterday, during my concluding session at the St Francis by the Sea Lenten Parish Retreat, we explored the art of forgiveness as an act of "fore-giving", to give something without it being asked for, unearned and perhaps unmerited and undeserved. We called it &#8220;a preemptive strike of love&#8221;. Here is what Henri Nouwen has to say about forgiveness and love:</p><br />
<p>“Forgiveness is the name of love practiced among people who love poorly. The hard truth is that all people love poorly. We need to forgive and be forgiven every day, every hour increasingly. That is the great work of love among the fellowship of the weak that is the human family.” </p><br />
<p>Henri J.M. Nouwen, The Only Necessary Thing (Crossroad, 2008)

Regret 1Please click here to visit: jdetermination.tumblr.com for more pictures by the photographer.

This Sunday’s Readings

This weeks readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which uses the New American Bible.

Click here for THIS SUNDAY’s  readings

Click Here to Listen to THIS SUNDAY’s readings

The Word on Fire

The Word On Fire – Fr. Robert Barron’s internet site offers many interesting insights into all things Catholic. Fr. Barron has a full library of homilies that he has prepared and we will be featuring a link here to his 15 minute reflections on this week’s readings.

This Sunday: “Peter and Paul were the greatest “christophers,” Christ-bearers in the early days of the church. Though they were very different, they came together in their love for Jesus and their conviction that he was Lord. It is largely because of their witness that we gather still today in the name of Jesus.

Click here to listen to Fr. Barron’s Homily for This Sunday

Fr. Greg Friedman

Sunday Soundbites is a weekly, 90-second radio homily based on the Sunday readings, written and read by Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. Sunday Soundbites is also heard on Catholic radio stations around the country.

This Sunday:Visitors to Rome can see St. Peter’s Basilica, the center of the Christian world, and the church of St. Paul Outside the Walls. These two great churches, honoring the saints we celebrate today, are immense structures—when I visited them for the first time, I felt overwhelmed. The vast open spaces, towering pillars and sculptures, distant ceiling—all take visitors outside of themselves.

Click here to listen to This Sunday’s Soundbite.

The ChurchYear.Net site is a resource that provides short and highly readable information on the Church Liturgical Year.

Ordinary Time is the liturgical period outside of the other liturgical seasons, and runs 33 or 34 weeks. In Latin, Ordinary Time is called Tempus Per Annum (“time throughout the year”). The season falls between Christmas and Lent, and between Easter and Advent, exclusive.

Click here to read more about Ordinary Time

This video is a bit long but it is wonderfully told story of how one man found peace in the strangest of places.

Dewey Bozella was locked up for 26 years – a lifetime – for a crime he did not commit. This story is about the triumph of human spirit and living proof of the maxim: “never give up”. One man’s journey to reclaim his life, against all odds; a man fighting his biggest fight outside the boxing ring without any hatred or bitterness towards the system. Dewey Bozella – courageous, persistent, human and finally…free

Video from KarmaTube

Smiles Quote HopePlease click here to visit: jdetermination.tumblr.com for more pictures by the photographer.

This Sunday’s Readings

This weeks readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which uses the New American Bible.

Click here for THIS SUNDAY’s  readings

Click Here to Listen to THIS SUNDAY’s readings

 

The Word on Fire

The Word On Fire – Fr. Robert Barron’s internet site offers many interesting insights into all things Catholic. Fr. Barron has a full library of homilies that he has prepared and we will be featuring a link here to his 15 minute reflections on this week’s readings.

This Sunday: “All of us are on a spiritual journey from sin to salvation. Like the Israelites longing for a return to Egypt, many of us occasionally desire our old addictions, providing the anxious ego with comfort and security. Far from Egypt, the Promised Land is the spiritual space of complete dependence upon God. But the Israelites are not there yet. They need to eat the manna from heaven. For Catholics, this is the Eucharist. It is the means to getting God’s divine life within us. ”

Click here to listen to Fr. Barron’s Homily for This Sunday

Fr. Greg Friedman

Sunday Soundbites is a weekly, 90-second radio homily based on the Sunday readings, written and read by Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. Sunday Soundbites is also heard on Catholic radio stations around the country.

This Sunday:As a friar, I’ve had the privilege to go on pilgrimage. Traveling to a holy place with other pilgrims is an experience of getting to know God, self and others. An important part of pilgrimage, believe it or not, is the food. You may smile, wondering what pilgrimage meals have to do with spirituality. Well, I enjoyed some of my best spiritual experiences around the table with my fellow pilgrims. The meals on pilgrimage in Assisi, Italy, were, of course, wonderful! But my memory of those meals always includes the wonderful people with whom I shared the food. It nourished both body and spirit.

Click here to listen to This Sunday’s Soundbite.

The ChurchYear.Net site is a resource that provides short and highly readable information on the Church Liturgical Year.

The Solemnity of Corpus Christi commemorates the Eucharist; traditionally it falls on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday, although in some regions it is transferred to the following Sunday.

Click here to read more about Solemnity of Corpus Christi

A bit of wisdom we can all learn from:

Mercy QuotePlease click here to visit: jdetermination.tumblr.com for more pictures by the photographer.

A Taoist story tells of an old man who accidentally fell into the river rapids leading to a high and dangerous waterfall. Onlookers feared for his life. Miraculously, he came out alive and unharmed downstream at the bottom of the falls. People asked him how he managed to survive.

“I accommodated myself to the water, not the water to me. Without thinking, I allowed myself to be shaped by it. Plunging into the swirl, I came out with the swirl. This is how I survived.”

– See more at: http://truecenterpublishing.com/zenstory/goflow.html#sthash.sPh0W5fe.dpuf

I Wish You Enough!

Here a story someone recently sent me:

Recently I overheard a Father and daughter in their last moments together at the airport. They had announced the departure. Standing near the security gate, they hugged and the Father said, “I love you, and I wish you enough.”

The daughter replied, “Dad, our life together has been more than enough. Your love is all I ever needed. I wish you enough, too, Dad.”

They kissed and the daughter left. The Father walked over to the window where I was seated. Standing there I could see he wanted and needed to cry. I tried not to intrude on his privacy, but he welcomed me in by asking, “Did you ever say good-bye to someone knowing it would be forever?”

“Yes, I have,” I replied. “Forgive me for asking, but why is this a forever Good-bye?”

“I am old, and she lives so far away. I have challenges ahead and the reality is – the next trip back will be for my funeral,” he said.

“When you were saying good-bye, I heard you say, ‘I wish you enough.’ May I ask what that means?”

He began to smile. “That’s a wish that has been handed down from other generations. My parents used to say it to everyone…” He paused a moment and looked up as if trying to remember it in detail, and he smiled even more. “When we said, ‘I wish you enough,’ we were wanting the other person to have a life filled with just enough good things to sustain them.” Then turning toward me, he shared the following as if he were reciting it from memory.

“I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright no matter how grey the day may appear.
I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun even more.
I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive and everlasting.
I wish you enough pain so that even the smallest of joys in life may appear bigger.
I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.
I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.
I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye.”

He then began to cry and walked away. They say it takes a minute to find a special person, an hour to appreciate them, a day to love them; but then an entire life to forget them.

This Sunday’s Readings

This weeks readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which uses the New American Bible.

Click here for THIS SUNDAY’s  readings

Click Here to Listen to THIS SUNDAY’s readings

 

The Word on Fire

The Word On Fire – Fr. Robert Barron’s internet site offers many interesting insights into all things Catholic. Fr. Barron has a full library of homilies that he has prepared and we will be featuring a link here to his 15 minute reflections on this week’s readings.

This Sunday: “God is Trinity. He is fundamentally a relationship: a lover, a beloved and the love between them. In other words, God is a complete openness and receptivity to the other. He is love. Now, we believe we are made in the image of God. Thus, we become fully alive to the degree that we imitate God. ”

Click here to listen to Fr. Barron’s Homily for This Sunday

Fr. Greg Friedman

Sunday Soundbites is a weekly, 90-second radio homily based on the Sunday readings, written and read by Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. Sunday Soundbites is also heard on Catholic radio stations around the country.

This Sunday: “Will return soon”

Click here to listen to This Sunday’s Soundbite.

The ChurchYear.Net site is a resource that provides short and highly readable information on the Church Liturgical Year.

Trinity Sunday commemorates and honors not an event, but a reality: the Holy Trinity. Trinity Sunday falls on the Sunday after Pentecost.

Click here to read more about Trinity Sunday

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